Started making a scalloped border for my new room in the Big City, to add a bit of class. Also there are no hooks. Blu-tack is my new best friend. (If you’re interested, I used sticky notes and masking tape to make the border, from a Rookie tutorial!)

Started making a scalloped border for my new room in the Big City, to add a bit of class. Also there are no hooks. Blu-tack is my new best friend. (If you’re interested, I used sticky notes and masking tape to make the border, from a Rookie tutorial!)

outcastmagazine

Things we wished we knew when we started college

outcastmagazine:

  • When studying, study the hardest subject first. The easier ones will then seem like a breeze. If you leave the hardest one until last you’ll just end up avoiding it forever.
  • Take study breaks every hour or so. If you’re in the library you can leave your stuff on the table and disappear for twenty minutes or so (but if the libraries are packed and you’re gone for more than half an hour you’ll probably get some side-eye on your way back in)
  • Take advantage of wearing your favourite clothes in the first week because by the second week you and everyone else will be in baggy pants, pajamas and dungarees. 
  • Try get to class on time to avoid the embarrassment of having to walk in when the lecture has started.
  • Go to college the morning after big events. These are usually very calming days when the most fun things happen because everyone’s hungover and delusional. 
  • The social dynamics are completely different than secondary school. It’s a completely fresh start and everyone is on the same social level.
  • The canteen lady and the security guards will be your best friends by fourth year.
  • Start your work as soon as you get it because it will pile up very quickly and next thing you know it’s four o’clock in the morning and you’re crying over an essay that’s due in 5 hours and you only have 200 words.
  • If you’re in art college you’ll soon learn that the majority of the time the art work comes first and the concept behind it comes later.
  • It’s ok to take sick days once in a while but its also very easy to fall behind, so do try to drag your ass in. And if you’re not going to make it send a quick email to your lecturer apologising for your absence.
  • There’s a big difference between sitting on the left side of the room and the right side of the room. I dont know what it is, but its there.
  • With smaller classes, where everyone sits on the first day is where they will sit for the rest of the year because of some unspoken force.
  • If you feel like wearing your penneys finest baggy pants into college- do it. It’s fine. No one cares. 
  • The Writing/Resource centre is extremely helpful to some people and completely crappy for others. It’s all about how you learn, and both ways are ok. But if you struggle with writing in any way it’s always worth paying them a visit.
  • Some of the colleges have their doctors office in ridiculously public places (IADT’s is right across from the canteen and you have to weave in and out of the chairs to get to it. If you have to pee in a cup everyone will know about it.) so your privacy on that front may not be so private.
  • Learn how to cook, and eat healthily. The more you know about cooking the cheaper you can make healthy foods. Living off ramen noodles might seem like the cheapest option, but if you know what you’re doing there are cheaper and better ways.
  • The person with the car will become your best friend.
  • If anyone’s going for a ride somewhere and asks if you wanna come along, say yes. It doesnt matter what you’re doing, drop it and go with them. 99.9% of the time it’ll be the funnest thing you do all day. 
  • Make as many connections as you can because they will be vital come job hunting time when you leave college.
  • Most of what you learn about during these years will be outside of the classroom. Especially if you’re in art college, it’ll be the life experiences that really shape the path you will take.
  • Ring home often. Don’t loose touch with your family because they probably miss you like hell.
  • But don’t go home every single weekend, you’ll miss all the fun. Plus weekends are sometimes needed to catch up on work.
  • Take pictures. Lots of them. Your years in college are worth documenting. 
  • You will almost definitely cry in public at least once a year and that’s totally ok, you’ll probably get a free cup of tea out of it.
  • Have a snack with you at all times. 
  • You will be a completely different person by the end of first year.
tommycollison

tommycollison:

Okay y’all so an app a friend helped to develop was featured in Wired (aw hell yeah) that A) tries to prevent scenarios where sexual assault may occur and B) supports victims of sexual assault after it occurs and I realized that I hadn’t written about it here, so listen up.

image

With

studyingoverprocrastination
thegrumpystudent:

How to Study for Exams From the First Day of School- Short ways to Ace your Exams 

Recently, I’ve been trying to pick up differences in the ways I study and the way some of my friends study and I feel like almost every single one of them get stressed during exam time. The main reason? They wait too long to start studying and then freak out when they realise how much they have to do. And then there’s me, completely chill, got all ten hours of sleep and feel ready to set the exam. That’s not because I’m some kind of genius, it’s all because I start studying for exams the very minute school opens. Sounds weird, (and slightly nerdy) but  by consistently studying a bit everyday, it’s so much easier to do well in exams. Before I give you my tips, there’s one thing you should know….
DON’T leave studying till a week before an exam— I feel like a lot of people say that you should start studying early, but their definition of “early” is a week. How are you supposed to go over a whole year or half years worth of work, do practice questions, figure out what you need to work on, get help and clear your doubts and make sure you have everything you need to know in a WEEK? It might work for some of you, but for most, that’s the worst thing you could ever do. 
So onto my ways to study for exams the minute school opens! 
1. In each class, write down a couple of dot points about what you covered that lesson. For example, I’ll use Biology. If your teacher covered osmosis, diffusion and active transport in a lesson, write those topics down. Don’t be lazy about this, because if you do it consistently, at the end of the year, you’ll have a rough revision sheet of all the topics you need to cover in the exam before the teacher even hands them out. 
2. Everyday, or even every two days, go back over everything you’ve learned so far. The method I like the best to do this is to read through the notes once and write up questions, so I can make sure I know the concepts. My textbooks also have questions at the end of each chapter and after a few concepts, so i look for those and do them as well. 
3. Pinpoint what you don’t know straight away. If you’re going through your algebra work and can’t do certain questions, find out how to do them as soon as possible. That way, towards exam time, you won’t have a whole bunch of stuff you don’t know how to do. 
4. Try to get work done everyday. Everyone’s busy and everyone deserves some downtime away from school, but try to at least study 45 mins to an hour everyday. It’ll get you in the habit of working and you’ll get stuff done without even realising it. 
5. Get ahead! Ask your teacher what the next topics he/she is going through will be and find out if there are any exercises or questions they want you to focus on. Finish up the chapter your class is working on and keep moving forward if you’re done before everyone else. Not only do you get more time to learn all your information and don’t have to deal with the stress of having exams around the corner and your teacher still has completed the syllabus. 
7. Remember that you can always learn more. If you’ve written all your notes for the next five chapters, done all the questions, got any questions answered by the teachers and are sitting back thinking, what now? DON’T forget about your work. That’s just as bad as studying a few days before the exam. Find practice tests or worksheets that deal with your topic online, watch revision videos on youtube, use different methods of studying like flashcards, try studying with other people, or even become a tutor if you think you’re good enough at the subject. All these will help your mind to not forget about what you’ve learned and help reinforce it. 

So those are my tips for studying for exams from day 1. I’ve done all of this and continue to do so, and can’t remember the last time I actually worried about an exam. I hope I helped! 

thegrumpystudent:

How to Study for Exams From the First Day of School- Short ways to Ace your Exams 

Recently, I’ve been trying to pick up differences in the ways I study and the way some of my friends study and I feel like almost every single one of them get stressed during exam time. The main reason? They wait too long to start studying and then freak out when they realise how much they have to do. And then there’s me, completely chill, got all ten hours of sleep and feel ready to set the exam. That’s not because I’m some kind of genius, it’s all because I start studying for exams the very minute school opens. Sounds weird, (and slightly nerdy) but  by consistently studying a bit everyday, it’s so much easier to do well in exams. Before I give you my tips, there’s one thing you should know….

  • DON’T leave studying till a week before an exam— I feel like a lot of people say that you should start studying early, but their definition of “early” is a week. How are you supposed to go over a whole year or half years worth of work, do practice questions, figure out what you need to work on, get help and clear your doubts and make sure you have everything you need to know in a WEEK? It might work for some of you, but for most, that’s the worst thing you could ever do. 

So onto my ways to study for exams the minute school opens! 

1. In each class, write down a couple of dot points about what you covered that lesson. For example, I’ll use Biology. If your teacher covered osmosis, diffusion and active transport in a lesson, write those topics down. Don’t be lazy about this, because if you do it consistently, at the end of the year, you’ll have a rough revision sheet of all the topics you need to cover in the exam before the teacher even hands them out. 

2. Everyday, or even every two days, go back over everything you’ve learned so far. The method I like the best to do this is to read through the notes once and write up questions, so I can make sure I know the concepts. My textbooks also have questions at the end of each chapter and after a few concepts, so i look for those and do them as well. 

3. Pinpoint what you don’t know straight away. If you’re going through your algebra work and can’t do certain questions, find out how to do them as soon as possible. That way, towards exam time, you won’t have a whole bunch of stuff you don’t know how to do. 

4. Try to get work done everyday. Everyone’s busy and everyone deserves some downtime away from school, but try to at least study 45 mins to an hour everyday. It’ll get you in the habit of working and you’ll get stuff done without even realising it. 

5. Get ahead! Ask your teacher what the next topics he/she is going through will be and find out if there are any exercises or questions they want you to focus on. Finish up the chapter your class is working on and keep moving forward if you’re done before everyone else. Not only do you get more time to learn all your information and don’t have to deal with the stress of having exams around the corner and your teacher still has completed the syllabus. 

7. Remember that you can always learn more. If you’ve written all your notes for the next five chapters, done all the questions, got any questions answered by the teachers and are sitting back thinking, what now? DON’T forget about your work. That’s just as bad as studying a few days before the exam. Find practice tests or worksheets that deal with your topic online, watch revision videos on youtube, use different methods of studying like flashcards, try studying with other people, or even become a tutor if you think you’re good enough at the subject. All these will help your mind to not forget about what you’ve learned and help reinforce it. 

So those are my tips for studying for exams from day 1. I’ve done all of this and continue to do so, and can’t remember the last time I actually worried about an exam. I hope I helped! 

mimsy-scribbles

College Help Masterpost

mimsy-scribbles:

Since some of my friends are graduating next week and I’ll be graduating next year, I thought I’d put this together. Please feel free to add useful links or shoot me a message so I can. Hope this helps!

Under readmore for length; sections include: textbooks, packing, college survival tips, studying, test taking, resources, writing papers, writing a college application essay, managing time, studying with apps/computers, motivation, loans, and blogs on studying.

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